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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #20 by ladyk
Posted: April 14, 2010 at 14:52
Jasmin -

In my opinion you should all go to see an Infectious Disease specialist and be treated at same time. It would help all of you to learn about cross contamination so that you aren't passing the bacteria back and forth.

Wash your hands often, avoid biting fingernails, don't pick nose or at lesions (drainage is a contagion), don't share personal items - towels, razors, bar soap, and wash clothes separately.

Work on building up your immune system.

And learn all you can about MRSA, so you can protect yourselves, and others.

Hope this helps.

ladyk
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #21 by Bob Anderson
Posted: April 14, 2010 at 19:27
I cannot give any medical advice, all I can do is discuss garlic and how it works in general terms and let you make your own decisions.

If you are desperate and haven't found any of the expensive things that really works, here is some information from another post you might find helpful:

Crushed raw non-irradiated garlic (CRG) is more effective against MRSA than anything medical science currently has in their arsenal.

Most people want to eat garlic or take garlic pills but that is not very effective against either Mrsa infection. Numerous unrelated studies have shown crushed raw garlic to be very effective when applied directly to MRSA and MRSA cannot become immune to it.

I would think it to be worth trying a few times. Even if it doesn't give the desired results, no harm is done and it didn't cost much money.

When added to water, CRG does not lose any of its antibiotic properties but only thins it iut and helps it increase contact with surfaces, especially skin. It soaks into the skin like a transdermal patch and works its magic in the subdural areas as well. It kills MRSA on contact and MRSA cannot become innune to it.

If there is no adverse reaction, bathing in even a mild garlic water bath can do wonders and doesn't cost much. Sure people smell like garlic for a few hours afterwards but they usually feel better and it kills any staph where the water came into contact with it.

On the bruise-like scars from skin lesions, if killed off with garlic water when they are just forming, they don't develop so the cellular losses don't occur, therefore there are no "bruises". That's the beauty of it, literally.

If it relieves the suffering of a small child, maybe the garlic aroma could be seen as less offensive or even as a good thing. The way I look at it, it is better to smell like garlic than to have MRSA.

If applied directly on the lesion undiluted crushed raw garlic burns fiercely for about a minute and so direct application is not recommended, especially with small children. The main thing is being sure they're not allergic but few people are.

The garlic water has no burn but it takes longer and more treatments to work.

Only non-irradiated garlic works. The way to tell is to cut a clove down the center and if it has a tiny page green leaf in the heart of the clove, it is good garlic; if not, it has been irradiated and is dead and has no health benefits.

I will make another post below this one with a little more information you may find helpful - or not, as you see fit.

Hope this information helps.





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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #22 by Bob Anderson
Posted: April 14, 2010 at 19:29
All forms of garlic that you eat, including raw garlic and garlic pills and oils, have what I call secondary benefits in that they build up the immune system but do not actively fight the infectious process itself, only crushed raw garlic does that and then only if you can get it to the site of the infection.

There is no serious questioning the fact that crushed raw garlic kills staph and that staph can't become immune to it; the problem is getting it to the site of the infection, which is easy to do if the site of the infection is on or near the surface. If it is deeply submerged, that is another matter.

The art comes in finding creative ways to get the allicin to the where it's needed. It's a battle you have to fight all by yourself because there are no FDA protocols outlining its usage.

Garlic water is the most practical approach because garlic retains its antibiotic punch even when quite diluted; it's just not as strong diluted as it is straight but what is? You can gargle with it, you can use it in douches and enemas and you can even bathe in it and get it into your system through your skin. You can chug-a-lug garlic water to get a flush of allicin into the blood stream – that’ll actually give you a little buzz.

Crushed raw garlic damages cells; that's what it does and that's what makes it a killer of MRSA and why MRSA cannot become immune to it. The idea is to get this substance into contact with the staph in sufficient concentration to kill the staph while doing little or no damage to the surrounding body cells. What little damage crushed raw garlic does to the skin is easily repaired by natural body defenses; the problem is the burning sensation that is felt when it is applied directly to a lesion.

If applied directly on the lesion undiluted crushed raw garlic burns fiercely for about a minute and then the burning dissipates and when it does, the lesion is already on the way to healing. Most people prefer to avoid the burn. Healing is rapid and complete when dealing with a localized outbreak.

The garlic water has no burn but it takes longer and more treatments to work. I would dilute it no more than necessary to stop the burn – it doesn’t make ordinary skin burn, only the lesion, itself.

Only non-irradiated garlic works. The way to tell is to cut a clove down the center and if it has a tiny page green leaf in the heart of the clove, it is good garlic; if not, it has been irradiated and is dead and has no health benefits.

Don't take my word for it, Google "garlic and staph" and see what you find.

Hope this helps.

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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #23 by caringaj
Posted: April 30, 2010 at 20:17
I have been MRSA free for almost 6 years. In 2004 I was hospitalized two times for MRSA. The first time for 5 days when I was diagnosed with MRSA. I had three boils. They put me on Levaquin and Vancomyacin IV. I was sent home with an IV for 5 days. My doctor had no idea how I got this. I haden't been in the hospital, my immune system was tested twice after the fact and I was fine, and to this day my doctor and I have no idea how I picked it up.

The second time - 8 months later I again was put in the hospital with a boil on my leg and it had to be lanced. I was in the hospital for 8 days, put on Rifampin and IV vanco and was sent home with a PIC lines to continue with the vanco and also to continue with the Rifampin. Again my immune system was tested and everything was fine.

Be very careful if you are given Rifampin. 6 weeks after my last stay I had to call an ambulance and was put in the hospital for 5 weeks. The Rifampin, in addition to Macrobid I was taking daily to prevent UTIs, Tylenol PM and the statin I was taking for chlorestoral caused me to have TOXIC DRUG INDUCED HEPATITIS AND TOXIC DRUG INDUCED LUPUS. I was under a doctor's care for these terrible ailments for almost a year.

I have been MRSA free for 6 years, do not have Lupus and do not have Hepatitis. The only preventive measures I take since my hospitalizations are to swab my nose with municipron about twice a week and constanly wash my hands and use antiobiotic gell. No garlic, or antything along those lines.

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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #24 by S
Posted: May 4, 2010 at 03:49
Where do you get musicipron?

is the garlic from the grocery store good enough?
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #25 by caringaj
Posted: May 4, 2010 at 05:51
In order to get municipron you have to get an RX from your physician. Make sure you get the ointment and use it to swab your nose and to put on any skin breaks. Paper cuts, etc.
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #26 by Sara
Posted: May 24, 2010 at 07:48
I would really like a more definitive answer on the subject as well. I have been infected for three years, and I can't seem to get rid of it no matter what I do. I can feel my body becoming weaker every time it flares up. I can't afford any kind of health insurance, so when I go to the hospital they drain the wound and send me home. I hate to say it, but I believe I am starting to feel death coming on. I am so desperate for help, but it seems there is none to be had, at least not for a poverty stricken college freshman like myself. Any suggestions/ coping tips are more than welcome. And I am so sorry to all of you who also know what kind of hell MRSA causes. I know I wouldn't wish this on my worst enemy. Good luck everyone.
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #27 by ladyk
Posted: May 24, 2010 at 17:25
Sara -

I'm sorry you're feeling so lousy.

What are you using for topical care to reduce bacteria overload?

What are you doing to support your immune system?

When was your last lesion cultured?

Please read through the forum topics concerning immune support and you will see how some of us have been able to control MRSA infection, which has brought a bit of normalcy back into our lives.

Hope to help.
ladyk


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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #28 by patti
Posted: June 5, 2010 at 20:56
my daughter is in 10th grade she started breaking out with the little MRSA pimples end of the summer going into 8th grade (2007). It took us till February of 2009 to get a firm diagnosis which turned out to be MRSA. The specialist we took her to put her on an antibiotic, i dont remember which one, and told her to start washing head to toes including hair and around her nose with hibiclens. The mrsa break outs started to go away and finally stopped completely. With the exception of one very small break out of two pimples this past April. She used her ointment and they went away almost immediately. But since March of 2009 she has had several sinus infections, a urinary tract infection, migranes, upper abdomen pain, discomfort in the kidney area, fevers...some with no additional symptoms, bouts of vomitting and mild bronchitis. In January she was diagnosed with panic attacks and mild depression. She says she never feels good. All above ailments have occured within the past year, some go away when treated some stop on their own. Nothing is ever found in blood tests or xrays or MRI's or CATscan. I dont know anymore if these things could be staph/mrsa related or depression related. Anyone have any ideas...?
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #29 by ladyk
Posted: June 8, 2010 at 19:48
patti -

As the forum reflects… many of us with MRSA positive history have had a myriad of related complications. Please know that Hibiclens carries warning which should be considered. This warning should be passed to your daughter since you state she is showering with product: DO NOT GET INTO EYES & EARS. Personally I’ve found Hibiclens Foam Pump makes working with the product much easier. Link below is for reference although product can be purchased at most local pharmacies, you’d just need to obtain a foaming pump style dispenser. http://www.cfamedical.com/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=1654

Where are her outbreaks Patti? Is she using Hibiclens as maintenance to reduce bacteria on her skin?

In my opinion… it would be important to research and learn all you can about affliction you/your daughter is up against, as well as information concerning immune support. MRSA is an aggressive pathogenic contagion. In your daughter’s case her immune system has not only taken bacterial blows responsible for outbreak infections, antibiotics also play a role in toxic effects on us as host, as well as disrupting our normal flora topically and internally. I have no doubt she doesn’t feel well. You can find many examples across forum that will confirm many symptoms as they relate to those of us who have MRSA positive history.

Building her body (supporting her immune system function) to the best possible health will (over time - there is no quick fix) bring a bit of normalcy back into her life. If you would like to discuss this further let me know, I’ll help all I can.

Does she have an Infectious Disease specialist following her? It is always best to have a specialist who wears the correct hat for the malady faced with. Also, it would be important to have any current lesions cultured… due to ‘inducible resistance’ which is documented to occur upon ingesting (particularly) antibiotics, example - Clindamycin.

On a personal note: Give as much support as you can possibly give her… dealing with MRSA can be overwhelmingly difficult on many levels for adults, let alone a youngster in the 10th grade.

I’m sorry she’s found herself dealing with MRSA.

My best to you and your daughter.

ladyk

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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #30 by Ashley
Posted: June 15, 2010 at 04:15
JASMINE: I also have had MERCER, and I have to live with multiple people who get sick quite easily. The best thing you can do is wash your hands OFTEN. Make sure to not let your sneezes go in the air, but into a tissue. Wash hands after messing with your nose, as Staph lives in the nose. Don't touch any cuts or pimples/boils on anyone else, unless wearing gloves. It's not so contagious you can't live with others, but you have to be careful, as you can carry staph for a long time, even for the rest of your life. You can't give blood either, unfortunately.P.S. DISINFECT ALL WOUNDS! very important. Hope this helps
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #31 by Melissa
Posted: September 1, 2010 at 03:12
I had MRSA like 4 months ago i got it treated. is it possible that it may come back because i got this bump on my hand and another bump and my other hand, also i have a bump although it looks like a boil around my private please help.. CAN MRSA COME BACK??????
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #32 by Bob Anderson
Posted: September 1, 2010 at 03:22
If you are not allergic to garlic, you might read the garlic threads on this forum. It should be a very educational experience for you.

Crushed raw non-irradiated garlic (CRG) kills MRSA on contact and MRSA cannot become immune to garlic the way it has pharmaceutical antibiotics because it kills in a different way.

This forum is the best place on the internet to learn about how to use garlic in different ways to fight MRSA - there is a lot more to it than eating it. When CRG is put into water, all of the water becomes antibiotic and is dose-dependent so a few cloves in a bathtub of water can kills all MRSA it comes into contact with.

Find out more about how garlic water can be used in many ways to kill all bacteria, including MRSA.

Educate yourself, an educated patient makes better decisions.

Good luck to you.
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #33 by ladyk
Posted: September 1, 2010 at 19:21
Melissa -

Yes. Get in to see an Infectious Disease specialist.

*Be sure you insist on having a lesion culture done (C&S), in order to identify, and appropriately treat.

Use proper precautions when active lesions are present, cover them, always use gloves, and wash wash wash your hands... to avoid cross contamination about yourself at different sites, as well as others.

ladyk

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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #34 by BLING BLING
Posted: September 14, 2010 at 04:03
HOW LONG DOES THE AVERAGE MRSA PERSON OT LIVE THE DISEASE,PLEASE GIVE ME AND ESTIMATE
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #35 by Catherine
Posted: April 12, 2011
I now am being treated for MRSA with antibiotics...can I get another outbreak while I
am being treated?
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #36 by ladyk
Posted: April 12, 2011 at 15:36
Catherine -

The answer to your question is… yes.

-If antibiotic is not susceptible.
-If antibiotic fails due to ‘inducible resistance’ for example in cases concerning clinical failure of Clindamycin/Erythromycin where a D-test must be performed.
-If one does not utilize topical maintenance care with antimicrobials in order to control bacteria topically.
-If one cross contaminates drainage from active lesion(s) to other sites about the body further outbreak is highly plausible when dealing with a pathogenic contagion like MRSA.
-If one is immune compromised.
-If one is an untreated carrier.

These are some of the ways further MRSA outbreaks are perpetuated.

Hope this helps to answer your question.

Have you had a MRSA positive culture? Have you been nare (nostril) cultured to determine carrier status? What antibiotic are you being treated with? Are you seeing an Infectious Disease specialist?

Best wishes,
ladyk

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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #37 by Bob Anderson
Posted: April 13, 2011 at 14:47
Catherine -

If you will read about the many ways to use crushed raw non-irradiated garlic in garlic baths, you will have less of a chance of re-infection.

Non-irradiated garlic truly does kill MRSA anbd MRSA cannot become immune to it. Garlic can be the MRSA p[atient's best friend once they learn how to recognize irradiated garlic from natural garlic and learn how to use it.

This forum is the best place on the internet to learn about garlic and how to use it.

The rest is up to you.

Yes, people who bathe in garlic water will smell garlicky for a little while but it truly does kill MRSA.

The choice is yours. The life you save may be your own.

Good luck to you.

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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #38 by courtney
Posted: June 18, 2011 at 03:06
i got mrsa about 3 years ago on my left armpit there were about 9 boils filled with puss, i took antibiotics for it but it didnt work, it slowly went away after draining the puss and putting a hot rag with salt on it, but then came back on my left hip but their was only about 5 boils filled with puss, and i did the same thing with draining it.. then it came back on my right leg and there was only about 2 or 3 boils filled with puss and i did the same thing. it went away for a few months but then came back really bad on my right armpit and their was around 11 puss filled boils.. does this mean its in my blood stream?
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Re: Once you have had MRSA, do you always have it?
Reply #39 by ladyk
Posted: June 19, 2011 at 18:13
courtney -

In my opinion it appears to me cross contamination, and perhaps lack of ‘consistent’ topical care regimen (Hibiclens antimicrobial wash in shower), are part of your problem. It would be important for you to read all you can about affliction particularly concerning avoidance of cross contamination, rather than perpetuating lesion outbreaks. [L armpit, L hip, R leg, R armpit] Not sure if you are aware MRSA is a pathogenic contagion… easily spread about one self and others. ANY drainage from lesion site must be considered highly contagious. Be sure cross contamination precautions are utilized any time MRSA lesions are present. Cover all actively draining lesions. Wash hands, wash hands, wash hands… use alcohol based hand sanitizer when you are unable to wash hands. Remember our hands give bacteria the legs they need to cross contaminate - colonize/infect, be aware of where you hands have been and where they are touching thereafter!

Hibiclens ‘Pump’(personally I find foam easier to work with)
http://www.cfamedical.com/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=1654

You can find cross contamination information on forum’s associated website MRSA AMERICA & Beyond (under drop down menu Carrier - Colonized, Hygiene, MRSA Basics)
http://webpages.charter.net/mrsa.america_beyond/index.html

Carrier - Colonized
It is important for you to know there are sites about the human body in which MRSA prefers… nares (nostrils), armpits, groin, perineum, buttocks, cross contamination sites, wounds, etc.

Here’s another thought… *if you are shaving underarms it is important not to cross contaminate bacteria from one armpit to the other. Bacteria transfer, as well as minute nicks perpetuate MRSA lesion activity. Do not use bar soap! One towel - one use.

You might consider trying Tea Tree Oil on lesions, as it calms itchy MRSA lesion(s), promotes healing… and if used at early lesion stage most often this will halt progression.

Do you have an Infectious Disease specialist following you? Have lesions been cultured? Have you had nares cultured to determine carrier status? Are you using supplementation to support your immune system? It is your immune system’s preprogrammed biological function to eliminate system invaders, of which it can not function properly if it does not have necessary tools.

It would be my suggestion that you follow common decolonization protocol… both topically and environmentally. AND build a better body internally through supplementation of that which you lack from your diet. Being proactive in your care will serve you best Courtney.

Hope this helps.

Best wishes,
ladyk

In answer to your question... blood cultures can be done to determine whether MRSA is present.

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