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How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Started by Anonymous
Posted: August 6, 2011 at 15:23
Sorry for the obtuse title, but it's the best one I could come up with
given the character limit.

Anyway, I was thinking of trying out a garlic bath to help treat my
staph infection, but was wondering:

- How much garlic should I use?
- How often should I do it?
- Any advice on how to properly prepare it?

Thanks.
19248
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #1 by Bob Anderson
Posted: August 6, 2011 at 17:14
Any natural garlic should work well as long as it has not been irradiated but a garlic that is hotter to the taste is considered better for medicinal purposes. Check your local farmers markets for locally grown garlic. Be sure to set some aside so you can plant your own crop in the fall so it won't cost you anything next year.

There have been no formal studies of garlic baths, they're just something I thought up and used myself with great results and so I am sharing my little secret with the world. the allicin in crushed raw garlic acts in a dose-dependent manner but simply don't know how much is enough or how much is too much but allergic reactions to garlic are rare and consist mostly of temporary reddening of the skin without long term effects. Still, people who try it are completely on their own and if it works they can take full credit for it.

My inclination would be to use smaller amounts with smaller children because they have less body mass. The same water can be re-used if the only consideration is bacteria because no bacteria can survive garlic water but viruses may be another matter. Since garlic is cheap , most people just make up a fresh batch for each bather.

Simply crush a small clove and let it set in air for 15 to 90 minutes so it can form all the metabolites it needs. Then add the crushed garlic to a quart or so of water and slosh it around well enough for the mixture to be complete and then filter out the particulate matter and add the garlic water to the bath water and insert bather.

An hour or so is preferrable because it allows a steady stream of allicin into the body through the skin and the longer the better but probably not over a couple of hours.

Some Chinese garlic distributors irradiate ther garlic to keep it from sprouting so it looks good on the shelf longer but the radiation kills the garlic and de-natures the enzyme, alliinase, which triggers the processes that result in the health benefits and antimicrobial properties of garlic. No alliinase, no allicin.

Fortunately there is an easy way to tell if a garlic has been irradiated.

Every clove of every natural bulb of garlic has a tiny sprout growing up from the root plate in a sheath in the inner core in the midst of an otherwise solid clove. Shortly after harvest it is tiny but grows with time and eventually grows larger. Simply remove a clove from a bulb and cut it open and look for the little sprout and if you find one, you have good garlic but if there is no sprout at all, then it has been irradiated and will not work.

This time of year in freshly harvested garlic the sprout can be very white and tiny and hard to see so there is a second test. Irradiated garlic has no hotness when chewed or eaten raw but natural garlic is usually hot to the taste when raw. Cut off the root plate of a clove and taste the clove right above the root plate and if it is hot, you have good garlic but if not, you don't.


19249
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #2 by Anonymous
Posted: August 6, 2011 at 18:44
Thank you for the thorough input, Bob. I appreciate it.

And it seems that, to my furtune, the garlic I usually buy from the
store is not irradiated, because they each have little sprouts in them
- and the burning from chewing them raw is nearly unbearable. :)

In any case, that answers any possible questions I had. And I'm also
sure that your advice will be useful to people Googling this too,
since information on the topic of garlic baths is relatively scarce
(which is what prompted me to create this thread).

Thank you.
19252
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #3 by Anonymous
Posted: August 6, 2011 at 19:31
Actually, it appears that I now have a few more questions, after having talked to
someone about this.

1) I was told that in order to properly create garlic water, one would have to let
the (crushed) garlic steep for at least two hours in hot water. Would it really take
that long? I figured a few minutes would do.

2) I was also told that one garlic clove would be nowhere near enough for a garlic
bath.

3) And, I was also recommended to try a salt-water bath, having salt cited as being
effective at killing bacteria.


I'm somewhat skeptical of those three points, and would appreciate any input on
them.

Once again, thank you.
19254
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #4 by Bob Anderson
Posted: August 6, 2011 at 22:17
Anonymous -

There is a great deal of misinformation about garlic going around and sometimes even the experts disagree. Then, too, manufacturers of garlic products routinely praise their own products and denigrate their competitors' products. Objectivity is hard to come by.

1. Upon crushing, garlic needs to set in air for a while (15 to 90 minutes but 30 is probably adequate but an hour might be better) in order to maximize the allicin and its breakdown metabolites such as Diallyl Trisulfide and Diallyl Disulfide, among others. Allicin's half-life in air is 16 hours but when added to water, it immediately stabilizes somewhat and its half-life extends to 30 to 40 days. When added to water the polysulfide formation is greatly slowed so 30 to 60 minuter is good for garlic water.

2. I'm an advocate of starting off mild until it is shown that the bather has no adverse reactions and then the dosage can be increased if needed. There is no truly correct answer until you say which kind of garlic you are talking about. With a mild garlic like Applegate or Dominec's, a whole bulb may not be enough but with a hot, strong Porcelain garlic like Romanian Red, even one medium clove may be more than enough. Not all garlics are the same.

One study I read about showed allicin to still be effective at a dilution of one part to 250,000 parts of water but the study did not say what kind of garlic was used.

3. I can see that the electrical properties of salt water could be helpful and a nice dip in the ocean or a sea salt bath might be beneficial because of all the other minerals though I would question whether bathing in refined sodium chloride would be beneficial for anyone prone to high blood pressure. I greatly lowered my blood pressure by getting refined sodium chloride out of my life and substituting a mix of sea salt and potassium chloride and now I'm back down to normal with no medications.

If you want to know more about the different kinds of garlics and their health benefits when used in different ways. Google Garlicmeister.

Hope this helps.

19259
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #5 by James
Posted: January 24, 2012 at 08:06
First off I live in Taiwan, I need garlic for medicinal reasons, so
taking irradiated garlic (which I think ive been doing) will be a
complete waste of my time and anybody else looking for the health
benefits of garlic such as allicin which is a natural and very
powerful antibiotic - irradiation DESTROYS allicin.

I bought some garlic from my local farmers market here in Taiwan but I
cannot be sure if its been irradiated or not - there is no root at the
bottom as its been cut off - the spine in the middle is WHITE (not
brown) the colour is white/purply and they all look around the same
size. I can post pictures if you want. From the description does it
sound like irradiated garlic?
20399
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #6 by Bob Anderson
Posted: January 24, 2012 at 13:31
James -

Even if the root plate is cut of you can still easily tell whether a garlic has been irradiated or not. Cut a clove open and look for a tiny growing sprout on the inside of the garlic clove, in the very heart of the clove, growing up from the root plate and this time of year it should be plainly visible growing up the center of the core of the garlic in its own little sheath.

Sometimes early in the fall the sprout may be tiny and growing up the middle from the root plate itself.

A second way is to bite a pie3ce out of a clove and if it is hot you have good garlic. If it is not hot to the taste it is either irradiated or is naturally too mild to be of much good so it is necessary to use more garlic. Hot garlic is strongly preferable.

Hope this helps.

20401
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #7 by Bob
Posted: January 24, 2012 at 18:25
thank you bob..do you mind looking at this picture to clarify? you see
in the centre of the clove is a green stork:

http://www.worldofstock.com/slides/PFO3094.jpg

there is no green stork in the middle of my cloves. It is white.

HOWEVER, I bought some cloves from the same store that had already
been peeled etc ready to cook. I sliced through the middle of one of
those cloves and found a yellowy/green stock in the middle. They had
been refrigerated for a number of days though.

Let me know what you think Bob and thanks again for your help. I need
to be 100% for obvious reasons.
20402
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #8 by Bob Anderson
Posted: January 24, 2012 at 20:49
That garlic in the picture is a good garlic that you can tell has not been irradiated because you can see the sprout in the middle of the clove.

It actually doesn't matter whether the sprout is white or any shade of green, it is alive. If it had been irradiated, there would be no sprout of any color, just an empty sheath where the sprout was before it was killed by the radiation.

Hope this helps.

20403
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #9 by James
Posted: January 24, 2012 at 22:48
thanks again for your quick reply Bob,

On further investigation, the unpeeled cloves DO NOT actually have a
stork in the middle, just an empty tunnel where it would have been or
sometimes a remnant of a once was healthy stork, which was confusing
before I compared the two.

I will stick with the PEELED garlic as it has a distinct
yellowery/green stork in the middle - its a shame the more fresh
garlic available to me is the one that has been nuked.

One more question Bob!
Will the cloves purchased that are ready peeled have lost some of
their allicin by being out of the skin for such a long time in the
supermarket?
20404
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #10 by Bob Anderson
Posted: January 24, 2012 at 23:53
Peeled garlic will wither after a few days and dry out and become almost useless. Garlic is best peeled as needed. Whole Asian garlic will store at room temp for about 5-6 months after harvest but a bulb that has been broken open will dry out sooner.

Good luck to you.


20405
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #11 by James
Posted: January 25, 2012
I have taken a picture of the fresh unpeeled garlic which I suspect has
been nuked, do you mind confirming for me? as you can see there is a
stork on this one, but its white.

http://postimage.org/image/tocw9zfs7/
20406
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #12 by James
Posted: January 25, 2012 at 01:00
Sorry about the last photo, I have taken a much better snap of what I
hope is a Taiwanese Garlic and not a Chinese nuked garlic! image below.

http://postimage.org/image/mlrj7pcb7/
20407
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #13 by Bob Anderson
Posted: January 25, 2012 at 05:19
Both of those pictures are of natural garlic that just had the growing tip of the sprout cut off. Was it hot when you bit into it?





20408
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #14 by James
Posted: January 25, 2012 at 21:49
Bob, thank you.

Yes its hot enough, not as hot as the garlic im used to in the UK
though. But, definitely hot nonetheless.

So we're on to a winner then! very happy.
20411
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #15 by James
Posted: January 26, 2012
Now that I have established im using REAL GARLIC, its time to go back to
topic subject: Garlic baths

Well, I chopped up a couple of bulbs, mashed them and put them in the
bath. I left the bath overnight for it all to settle and absorb into the
water. Is this method correct? will the allicin still be active after
leaving the garlic in the bath for 12-24 hours?

thanks
20412
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #16 by Bob Anderson
Posted: January 26, 2012 at 04:12
James -

That will kind of work OK but it is not best. It helps to let the crushed garlic in air for 15 to 30 minutes and then draw a fresh warm/hot bath and soak immediately for 60 to 90 minutes, the longer the better.

Once the garlic goes into the water and gets swirled around it will mix thoroughly in the tub once you get in.

The garlic water will equally potent the next day and can be reused for two or three days before it will develop a foul odor on its own and you will want to drain the tub. Of course, the tub may be needed for other things also.


You will be getting into cold water when the idea is to have a warm/hot enough bath to open up your pores and admit things from the outside world. Adding additional hot water will dilute the garlic and perhaps more garlic may be helpful - garlic is dose-dependent.










20413
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #17 by James
Posted: February 3, 2012 at 12:57
hey bob thanks for reply,

would you then tell me exactly how much garlic I should be using? how
many full bulbs? is 1 bulb ok?

thanks in advance
20462
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #18 by Bob Anderson
Posted: February 3, 2012 at 14:41
James -

If you have a mild garlic it may take a whole bulb or two. If you have a real hot garlic, only a clove or two may work. If you don't get good enough results, try more cloves and if that doesn't work. Unfortunately every garlic cultivar is different and this is not an exact science so you just have to try things. Unless a person is allergic, it is hard to overdose in a garlic bath.

It usually takes a series of garlic baths as one is seldom enough to effect a complete cure, especially if one has been affected with MRSA for a while. It takes time and repeated treatments but over time it will work.

It is rarely an instant cure.

Hope this helps.
20463
Re: How much garlic to use for a garlic bath?
Reply #19 by Ralph
Posted: March 10, 2012 at 23:29
Can you use garlic powder instead of fresh garlic ? If so how much would you add to the bath.
20620
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